News

Who needs village hall? Long Grove board to meet at brewery

Daily Herald - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 16:07
With Buffalo Creek Brewing as the venue, Long Grove officials are hoping to draw a good crowd for the return of an annual meeting of the village board and homeowners association presidents.

Lewis University awarded nearly $1 million STEM grant

Plainfield News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:48
ROMEOVILLE — The office of Rep. Dan Lipinski, D-Western Springs, announced Tuesday that the National Science Foundation's Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) program awarded a $961,000 grant to Lewis University.

The money will help support the university's Biology Transitions program, which provides support to low-income students with demonstrated financial need and academic promise in STEM fields at Lewis, according to a press release. The project will go to fund 28 scholarships over five years for transfer students who choose to pursue bachelor's degrees in biological sciences.

"This grant will be a great help as Lewis advances its commitment to training students for careers in STEM fields," said Lipinski in the press release.

The university's Biology Transitions program will also increase the number of underrepresented, economically disadvantaged students who complete four-year degrees and enter the STEM workforce. The program also incorporates intensive mentoring, academic support and undergraduate research opportunities to help at least 80 percent of Biology Transitions participants will graduate.

Lipinski serves on the Science, Space and Technology committee and is the top Democrat on the Subcommittee on Research and Technology and is the co-chair of the Congressional STEM Education Caucus.

Housing and Tax Reform: Where Could the Impact Land?

Real Estate News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:42

Homebuyers and homeowners are anticipating fallout from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which has changed homeownership incentives, including the deductions for mortgage interest and state and local taxes.

How deep the effect is hinges on location, according to new research.

With the bill’s new provisions, the mortgage interest deduction (MID) is applicable to loans of up to $750,000 (down from $1 million), and state and local tax (SALT) deductions are limited to $10,000. An analysis conducted recently by HouseCanary, provider of predictive real estate analytics and insights, determined that 82 percent of lost MIDs under the new laws are concentrated in 10 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), including four California MSAs and four East Coast MSAs.

All told, 6.4 percent of loans between $750,000 and $1 million could be affected by the changed MID, or $287 million in deductions lost total, the research reveals.

In the case of the deduction of state and local taxes, including property taxes, 66 of the 3,134 counties in the U.S. could be impacted, the research shows. Bearing the brunt could be Boston, Mass., New Jersey and New York, where citizens could depart for lower property taxes in other states.

“The recent tax bill clearly addresses some key deductions for many current and potential homeowners, yet the overall net effect on the nation’s housing picture is harder to discern,” says Alex Villacorta, executive vice president of Analytics at HouseCanary. “On the surface, the reduction in the caps for the mortgage interest deduction (MID) seem to squarely target the higher end of the nation’s housing inventory, specifically those homes valued between $750,000 and $1 million. Throw in the caps to the state and local taxes deductions, and even more force is added to the headwinds for homeownership.

“Yet, for most homebuying consumers, there may actually be real tax savings that could potentially assist acquisition of the necessary down payment for homeownership, something that has been elusive for many new entrants into the market,” Villacorta says. “What we do know at this point, however, is that this new tax bill will add another layer of uncertainty to a market that has been searching for some semblance of normal since the euphoric run-up and near economic collapse of the housing market over the last decade. The new normal of today’s market dictates that all market participants—buyers, sellers, lenders, and investors—will have to be vigilant at a granular level to better understand when or if this tax bill, or any other factor, affects their property’s market value.”

Thirty-three percent of Americans approve of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act; 55 percent disapprove, according to a Gallup poll in January. More than 35 percent of respondents to a December realtor.com® survey were “concerned” about homeownership in light of the reform.

For more information, please visit www.housecanary.com.

Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Housing and Tax Reform: Where Could the Impact Land? appeared first on RISMedia.

Help Your Agents Perfect Their Social Media Strategy

Real Estate News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:37

NAR PULSE—Back At You Media, the newest partner in the REALTOR Benefits® Program, provides powerful automated marketing to ensure your agents and their listings rise above the noise on social media. Learn about the three different plan options available to members of the National Association of REALTORS®. All have exclusive pricing for members. Learn more.

2018 NAR Member Orientation Video and Digital Materials Available Online
NAR’s 2018 New Member Orientation Materials are now available online for use by brokerages. NAR offers resources and tools to help brokers welcome new agents into the REALTOR® family, and its wealth of benefits and resources. Included is the new 2018 online video about NAR benefits to show at new agent orientation. The member orientation materials, including details about the online module, are available here.

Keep Business Moving With .realtor™
Kick off 2018 by claiming an exclusive .realtor™ domain for your firm and adding G Suite from Google Cloud and Placester®, a REALTOR Benefits® Program Partner, to your toolbelt. Learn more and get started today!

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Help Your Agents Perfect Their Social Media Strategy appeared first on RISMedia.

January is Radon Action Month and a good time to test your home - Southernminn.com

Radon Testing News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:36

whotv.com

January is Radon Action Month and a good time to test your home
Southernminn.com
Radon is an odorless, colorless radioactive gas, and it is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers. Radon occurs naturally in Minnesota soils, and enters homes through cracks or openings in walls or foundations. The only way to know if your home ...
How Often You Should Test Your Home for Radon | whotv.comwhotv.com
Experts find people are unaware of radon, the second leading cause ...Press of Atlantic City
Six things to know about radon | Local News | postbulletin.comPost-Bulletin
Mankato Free Press
all 19 news articles »

Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large Family Room In Oak Lawn - Patch.com

Oak Lawn Home Inspector News Feed - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:31

Patch.com

Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large Family Room In Oak Lawn
Patch.com
Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large Family Room In Oak Lawn-0; Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large Family Room In Oak Lawn-1; Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large Family Room In Oak Lawn-2; Top Notch Split Level, New Kitchen, Large ...

Home Laundry: To Vent or Not to Vent

Real Estate Consumer News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:30

I once believed it was a forgone conclusion that when adding certain laundry appliances to a home, it would mean installing exhaust ducting and cutting a hole to the outside for venting.

However, a recent report from Michele Weaver at Design Basics, LLC highlighted a growing trend in ventless dryers that can be easily located and relocated within a home because vent piping, exhaust holes and venting to the outside are not needed.

The mechanics of a home dryer can cause energy and safety problems if lint becomes trapped in the vent. This demands more energy use and frequent cleaning. Weaver believes one of the major trends consumers will be seeing in these key appliances will be the further refinement of ductless technology.

She says vent hoses snaking through a home’s framing have become a leading cause of the 2,900 (average) home clothes dryer fires reported annually, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.

J.D. Wollf at HomeSteady.com recently explained that a ventless or condenser dryer— also known as a Heat Pump Clothes Dryer (HPCD)—doesn’t need a vent because instead of expelling the hot, moist air, a heat exchanger removes the moisture from the hot air and “recycles” it, passing it back through the drying clothes. The excess water is then drained away or caught in a container that is later emptied.

The trade-off for energy savings and safety is a requirement for slightly more maintenance than vented dryers. Wollf says the condensing unit must be cleaned about once a month to remove any lint.

A study at the Florida Solar Energy Center at the University of Central Florida states that while an unvented HPCD uses less electricity than a standard resistance dryer, it was found to release significantly more heat than a conventional dryer during operation, demanding additional cooling energy that may compromise overall savings.

However, the study points out that with a current retail cost of $948, there is only a small premium on the HPCD dryers, making them cost-effective when chosen at time of replacement.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Home Laundry: To Vent or Not to Vent appeared first on RISMedia.

Home Laundry: To Vent or Not to Vent

Real Estate News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:30

I once believed it was a forgone conclusion that when adding certain laundry appliances to a home, it would mean installing exhaust ducting and cutting a hole to the outside for venting.

However, a recent report from Michele Weaver at Design Basics, LLC highlighted a growing trend in ventless dryers that can be easily located and relocated within a home because vent piping, exhaust holes and venting to the outside are not needed.

The mechanics of a home dryer can cause energy and safety problems if lint becomes trapped in the vent. This demands more energy use and frequent cleaning. Weaver believes one of the major trends consumers will be seeing in these key appliances will be the further refinement of ductless technology.

She says vent hoses snaking through a home’s framing have become a leading cause of the 2,900 (average) home clothes dryer fires reported annually, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.

J.D. Wollf at HomeSteady.com recently explained that a ventless or condenser dryer— also known as a Heat Pump Clothes Dryer (HPCD)—doesn’t need a vent because instead of expelling the hot, moist air, a heat exchanger removes the moisture from the hot air and “recycles” it, passing it back through the drying clothes. The excess water is then drained away or caught in a container that is later emptied.

The trade-off for energy savings and safety is a requirement for slightly more maintenance than vented dryers. Wollf says the condensing unit must be cleaned about once a month to remove any lint.

A study at the Florida Solar Energy Center at the University of Central Florida states that while an unvented HPCD uses less electricity than a standard resistance dryer, it was found to release significantly more heat than a conventional dryer during operation, demanding additional cooling energy that may compromise overall savings.

However, the study points out that with a current retail cost of $948, there is only a small premium on the HPCD dryers, making them cost-effective when chosen at time of replacement.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Home Laundry: To Vent or Not to Vent appeared first on RISMedia.

Experts find people are unaware of radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer - Press of Atlantic City

Home Inspection News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:05

Press of Atlantic City

Experts find people are unaware of radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer
Press of Atlantic City
A colleague who owned a home inspection business asked if she had ever heard about radon, and that piece of information spurred on Nixon and some of her neighbors to test their homes at a condominium association just 20 minutes south of Pittsburgh ...

and more »

Country home for sale in Blossom TX | United Coutry Real Estate - eParisExtra.com (blog)

Home Inspection News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 15:04

eParisExtra.com (blog)

Country home for sale in Blossom TX | United Coutry Real Estate
eParisExtra.com (blog)
Country ranch style home setting good distance from road on 8.9 acres just 2 miles from Blossom. Large spacious rooms. Kitchen has breakfast area with bay windows, plenty of cabinets, pantry. Den has fireplace with propane gas logs for additional heat ...

and more »

Getting a Roommate in Your Golden Years

As the baby boomers age, some are choosing to stay in their homes and take in boarders to help pay the rent or lend a hand with household chores.

Pope Francis begs forgiveness for 'irreparable' harm from sex abuse

Plainfield News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 14:38
SANTIAGO, Chile – Pope Francis begged for forgiveness Tuesday for the "irreparable damage" done to children who were raped and molested by priests, opening his visit to Chile by diving head-first into a scandal that has greatly hurt the Catholic Church's credibility here and cast a cloud over his visit.

Francis faced controversy on another front as well: Overnight three more Catholic churches were torched, including one burned to the ground in the southern Araucania region where Francis will visit on Wednesday to meet with Chile's indigenous peoples. While not causing any injuries, the nine church firebombings in the past few days have marked an unprecedented level of protest against history's first Latin American pope on his home turf.

In Santiago, though, an estimated 400,000 jubilant Chileans turned out in droves for his first public Mass, a massive gathering in the capital's O'Higgins park where St. John Paul II celebrated Mass three decades ago. Francis took a long, looping ride in his popemobile through the grounds to greet well-wishers, some of whom had camped out overnight to secure a spot.

In his first event of the day, Francis met privately with Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and addressed lawmakers, judges and other authorities at La Moneda palace. They interrupted him with applause when he said he felt "bound to express my pain and shame" that some of Chile's pastors had sexually abused children in their care.

"I am one with my brother bishops, for it is right to ask forgiveness and make every effort to support the victims, even as we commit ourselves to ensuring that such things do not happen again," he said.

Francis didn't refer by name to Chile's most notorious pedophile priest, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, who was sanctioned in 2011 by the Vatican to a lifetime of "penance and prayer" for sexually molesting minors. Nor did he refer to the fact that the emeritus archbishop of Santiago, a top papal adviser, has acknowledged he knew of complaints against Karadima but didn't remove him from ministry.

Karadima had been a politically connected, charismatic and powerful priest who ministered to a wealthy Santiago community and produced dozens of priestly vocations and five bishops. Victims went public with their accusations in 2010, after complaining for years to church authorities that Karadima would kiss and fondle them when they were teenagers.

While the scandal rocked the church, many Chileans are still furious over Francis' subsequent decision, in 2015, to appoint a Karadima protege as bishop of the southern city of Osorno. Bishop Juan Barros has denied knowing about Karadima's abuse but many Chileans don't believe him, and his appointment has badly split the diocese.

"Sex abuse is Pope Francis' weakest spot in terms of his credibility," said Massimo Faggioli, a Vatican expert and theology professor at Villanova University in Philadelphia. "It is surprising that the pope and his entourage don't understand that they need to be more forthcoming on this issue."

Anne Barrett Doyle, of the online abuse database BishopAccountability.org, praised Francis for opening his visit with the apology, but said Chileans expect him to take action against complicit church leaders.

"This is a crucial opportunity for Francis: With luck, he will not make the mistake of his brother bishops in underestimating the savviness and moral outrage of the Chilean people," said Barrett Doyle, who last week released research showing nearly 80 Chilean priests have been credibly accused or convicted of abuse.

The Karadima scandal and a long cover-up has caused a crisis for the church in Chile, with a recent Latinbarometro survey saying the case was responsible for a significant drop in the number of Chileans who call themselves Catholic, as well as a fall in confidence in the church as an institution.

That distrust extends to Francis, who is making his first visit as pope to this country of 17 million people. The Argentine pope is nearly a native son, having studied in Chile during his Jesuit novitiate and he knows the country well, but Chileans give him the lowest approval rating among the 18 Latin American nations in the survey.

"People are leaving the church because they don't find a protective space there," said Juan Carlos Claret, spokesman for a group of church members in Osorno that has opposed Barros' appointment as bishop. "The pastors are eating the flock."

For his part, Barros told local media after concelebrating the Mass with Francis and other bishops that he knew nothing of Karadima's crimes. "

"Many lies have been made about me," he said.

At a protest Tuesday near O'Higgins park where Francis celebrated Mass, police fired tear gas and water cannons before detaining several dozen demonstrators, according to an Associated Press photographer at the scene. Protesters carried signs with messages reading "Burn, pope!" and "We don't care about the pope!"

Other groups also called for demonstrations against the pontiff.

Victor Hugo Robles, an activist in Chile's lesbian and gay community, said the Vatican tries to paint an image of the pope as being close to the people, particularly those with the most needs.

"We are the ones who need help," said Robles. "Gay people, people living with AIDS. When it comes to those things, the church has an attitude of intolerance, of disgust."

Felipe Morales, from a group called the Workers' Socialist Front, said many were unhappy with the pope and the church's historical influence in Chile. They planned to protest as well.

"The role of the church has been nefarious," said Morales. "Sex abuse cases have been covered up and people are unhappy with many other issues."

To be sure, many were excited to see the pope, and they appreciated his apology for abuse.

"When people make a mistake it's necessary that they ask for forgiveness," said Monica Reyes, a nursing assistant who was inside La Moneda palace for the pope's speech.

Thousands lined the streets of Santiago to get a glimpse of Francis along his motorcade routes, and O'Higgins park was teeming with faithful attending the pope's Mass.

"It was amazing to see him," said Luis Salazar, a young boy who came out with his family to see Francis pass by in his popemobile.

The pope will try to inject new energy into the church during his visit, which includes sessions with migrants, members of Chile's Mapuche indigenous group and victims of the 1973-1990 military dictatorship. It remains to be seen if he will meet with sex abuse survivors. A meeting wasn't on the agenda, but such encounters never are.

Metra fares to increase Feb. 1 'to close $45 million funding gap'

Plainfield News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 14:22
The fare increase Metra officials voted on in November of last year will go into effect Feb. 1.

As part of the commuter rail system's $797.2 million operating budget for 2018, several fare increases are about to take effect, according to a news release from Metra.

Those increases include:

• The price of one-way tickets increasing by 25 cents in all zones (a 2.3 percent to 6.7 percent increase depending on the zone).

• The price of 10-ride tickets increasing from $4.25 to $7.75 (8 percent to 12.6 percent) depending on the zone.

• The price of monthly passes increasing from $9 to $12.50 (4.1 percent to 8.4 percent) depending on the zone. Monthly tickets are available for purchase in advance, with sales beginning on the 20th of each month

• The price of the weekend pass, which allows unlimited rides throughout the Metra system on both Saturday and Sunday, increasing to $10 from $8.

• The price of some reduced fare tickets and passes increasing.

Additionally, a number of weekday trains will be curtailed or eliminated on the North Central Service, SouthWest Service and Rock Island Line and weekend trains will be cut on the Milwaukee District North Line, starting Feb. 5.

This has caused some train runs to be eliminated, some train departure times to be changed, some trains to be renumbered and others to have changed or added station stops.

"Customers are advised to check the new schedules to understand how their commute may be affected," the release stated.

New schedules are available online at metrarail.com and paper copies will be available at Metra’s downtown stations next week.

Metra officials agreed upon the changes in November in an effort to close a $45 million funding gap. The company's new budget included about $17 million in fare increases, about $3 million in trims in service and a variety of other changes.

The board also approved a 2018 capital budget totaling $196.8 million, only one-sixth of Metra’s estimated annual need for the maintenance and renewal of its capital assets, according to the release.

“We are raising fares because everything we did last year will cost more to do this year,” Metra CEO/Executive Director Jim Derwinski said. “And we are raising fares because the public subsidies that would normally help us cover those rising costs have been cut. We are simply using these funds to cover the increased costs of operating the railroad.”

Board members said the shortfalls in funding for both operating and capital needs point to a growing problem with local, state and federal subsidies for public transportation, while voting to approve the 2018 budget.

"The sales taxes and state aid that fund about half of Metra’s operating budget and the local, state and federal grants that pay for nearly all of its capital budget are not keeping up with rising costs and the aging system’s replacement and renovation needs," the release stated.

Visit metrarail.com for more information about fare increases and service cuts.

On Location: Remaking a ‘Developer Special’ in Brooklyn

The generic townhouse in Carroll Gardens was nothing special. But now it’s family friendly, with surprising details.

Panama Hotel votes to drop Trump – but his company won't go

Plainfield News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 13:52
WASHINGTON – An attempt to oust President Donald Trump's hotel business from managing a luxury hotel in Panama has turned bitter, with accusations of financial misconduct.

Trump Hotels is contesting its firing, and its staff ran off a team of Marriott executives invited last month to visit the property during a search for a new hotel operator, according to two people familiar with the matter.

After the owners' association accused Trump Hotels of mismanagement and financial misconduct in a $15 million arbitration claim, the company owned by the president fired back with a $200 million counterclaim and refused to turn over the property's financial records. When a team from Marriott International Inc. came to the property at the invitation of the hotel's majority owner, Trump staff asked them to leave, according to the two people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss publicly what happened behind the scenes.

The head of Trump Hotels, Eric Danziger, also called Marriott chief executive Arne Sorenson to complain about the visit, the two people said.

Marriott generally steers clear of properties facing ownership and management disputes. But the call from a senior Trump executive to the CEO of Marriott, which manages more than 6,000 hotels, raised the awkward matter of how American companies interact with a business owned by the president.

Marriott, like most major international companies, has significant business and public policy interests before the Trump administration. Federal employees who travel and hold government conferences pay to use its properties, and Marriott has been lobbying the administration and Congress over U.S. tourism, trade and legal restrictions against property ownership in Cuba, disclosures to consumers about resort fees, and other issues.

Trump Organization general counsel Alan Garten said the call was not intended to pressure Marriott.

"We have a great relationship with Marriott," Garten said. "They were appreciative that we let them know that we have a valid contract."

A spokeswoman for Marriott declined to comment.

The matter highlights potential ethics concerns raised by Trump's decision not to divest himself from his businesses, said Larry Noble, head of the Campaign Legal Center, a Washington-based public interest group that studies issues of democracy.

"I don't know if they've got a valid contract or not," Noble said. "But if you're a big company, you'd really have to think twice before getting into a fight with one of the president's companies."

Since Trump took office, Trump hotels in New York and Toronto have quietly reached deals to separate themselves from Trump's brand.

But the Panama dispute is shaping up as a brawl.

In a letter to fellow owners, the investor leading the hotel owners' board of directors accused Trump Hotels of "gross mismanagement, breaches of contract, conversion and breaches of fiduciary duties." Conversion is a legal term for the misuse of someone else's property for one's own gain.

"Our investment has no future so long as the hotel is managed by an incompetent operator whose brand has been tarnished beyond repair," Orestes Fintiklis, the managing partner of Miami-based Ithaca Capital Partners, wrote in the letter. Trump Hotels, he wrote, "is refusing to maintain its last shreds of dignity and peacefully vacate our property."

Fintiklis did not respond to emails from the AP seeking comment.

Trump Hotels accused Ithaca of deceiving its fellow hotel owners and illegally terminating the Trump contract.

"Unfortunately, it is YOU, the unit owners, who will ultimately be the ones to bear responsibility for the bad acts of Mr. Fintiklis and his cohorts," said Trump Hotels executive vice president Jeff Wagoner in an earlier letter to the owners last week.

Rising 70 stories in the shape of a wind-filled sail, the Trump hotel promised investors a chance to become the part owner of one of Central America's finest hotels. It has struggled to sell units after its completion in 2011. Occupancy rates are low enough that some owners receive no income from their properties and must reach into their own pockets to pay maintenance costs.

The effort to remove Trump hotels from managing the hybrid condo-hotel units on the property began last year, after Ithaca Capital Group purchased 202 unsold hotel units from the building's struggling developer.

After buying the units in August, Ithaca and the other owners voted in November to fire Trump's directors, clearing the way for terminating Trump's contract and the $15 million arbitration claim against Trump Hotels.

Not all the hotel unit owners were represented at the meeting, but those contacted by The Associated Press support the effort to fire Trump.

"They wanted to remove him quietly," said Al Monstavicius, a retired Nevada doctor who owns a penthouse hotel unit in the building, of Ithaca's efforts. "That didn't work."

Monstavicius said Trump's statements regarding Mexicans and his determination to strip hundreds of thousands of Central Americans of their protection from deportation have made Trump's brand toxic in Panama.

Occupancy in recent days — considered peak high season — has ranged from 26 to 28 percent, according to Trump Hotels figures.

Overbuilding and general weakness in the Panama hotel market have contributed to problems. Trump's team said it was proud of the hotel's financial performance. It told owners Trump's hotel has outperformed its peers for 81 of the last 84 months, but Fintiklis dismissed the claim as "simply delusional."

The hostilities extended to Ithaca's invitation of Marriott executives to the property.

"We were obviously concerned about their presence there," Garten said, adding that he believed Marriott did not know of the circumstances.

The heart of Trump Hotels' claim against the hotel owners is a February 2017 agreement. When it bought 202 units, Ithaca agreed not to act "in any manner adverse to the interests of Trump Hotels." In his letter, Fintiklis acknowledged the language in the agreement but said mismanagement and misconduct by Trump Hotels rendered it invalid.

If the owners in Panama succeed, it won't be the first time that Trump has been ousted there. In 2015, amid the early months of Trump's presidential campaign, the owners of apartments in the same building voted to fire Trump's management company over budget issues and allegations of misspent funds.

Since then, the property's overall finances have improved. Its annual deficits, which exceeded $1 million, have since turned into a surplus, according to financial documents provided to the AP by an owner.

Tax code change dings ADM

Chicago Real Estate - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 13:32
A provision in the new law unintentionally favors farm cooperatives over the Chicago agribusiness company and its ilk. But it may not last.

Emanuel picks up a re-election rival

Chicago Real Estate - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 13:20
Ex-CPS principal Troy LaRaviere forms a fundraising committee, starts taking campaign cash and says he's definitely going to challenge the mayor.

Would you move to Wisconsin to save 10 minutes?

Chicago Real Estate - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 13:00
Chicago millennials, Wisconsin wants you to think the Badger State is "more you," and it's launching a multimillion-dollar marketing campaign to prove it. But the ads may miss the mark.

1 injured following 5-vehicle crash on I-55 to I-80 ramp

Plainfield News - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:55
SHOREWOOD – One individual was hospitalized after a five-vehicle collision Tuesday morning on the ramp between Interstates 55 and 80 near Shorewood.

“The ramps were real icy over there – a bunch of cars had slid off,” Troy Fire Deputy Chief Howard Hoffman said.

Troy firefighters responded just after 8:45 a.m. Tuesday to the ramp from southbound I-55 to westbound I-80 for the multi-vehicle crash, Hoffman said.

When crews arrived, they found that five cars were involved in the crash and two had traveled into the ditch. One individual was transported to Presence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Joliet, and Hoffman did not know his or her condition.

Illinois State Police also responded to the crash and blocked off the ramp for more than 30 minutes. Police handled several other spinouts in the same area Tuesday morning, Hoffman said.

The Will County area received three to four inches of snow over the long weekend, according to National Weather Services estimates, and a chance of flurries persisted through Tuesday. The precipitation, combined with below freezing temperatures, made for slick roads in the morning rush hour.

“Be careful on ramps and bridges," Hoffman said. "Those freeze really fast; that’s where most of our problems have been this morning."

Police did not immediately respond to requests seeking more information about the crash.

GE chief renews pledge to study breakup after $6.2B stumble

Chicago Real Estate - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:00
The conglomerate—whose health care division is headquartered in Chicago—is "looking aggressively at the best structure or structures for our portfolio."

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